Nutrition Publication

Child Oncology

Editor(s): International Committee of Paediatricians. 63 / 3

The Epidemiology and Aetiology of Childhood Cancer Leukaemias and Lymphomas in Children Solid Tumours in Children Tumors of the Central Nervous System in Infants and Children Nutritional Aspects of Childhood Oncology This publication is not available online yet. You can buy it on the Karger website

Related Articles

Editorial

Author(s): Editorial Committee

The Epidemiology and Aetiology of Childhood Cancer Leukaemias and Lymphomas in Children Solid Tumours in Children Tumors of the Central Nervous System in Infants and Children Nutritional Aspects of Childhood Oncology This publication is not available online yet. You can buy it on the Karger website

The Epidemiology and Aetiology of Childhood Cancer

Author(s): R.J.Q. McNally, T.O.B. Eden

No text on childhood cancer would be completewithout consideration of aetiology and epidemioology.The first aim of this chapter is to review the literature on incidence patterns, temporal trends, seasonal variation, clustering and ecological studies. The second aim is to reviewthe literature on genetic and environmentalrisk factors, especially from case-control and cohort studies. For this exercise relevant papers have been identified using PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/PubMed). Due to limitations of space it is not possible to cite all references. The main findings are summarisedand only key references are given.

Leukaemias and Lymphomas in Children

Author(s): E. Forestier, K. Schmiegelow

Malignant lymphoid and myeloid diseases in children are the largest subgroup of childhood cancers. They are the consequence of acquired genetic alterations that modify cell growth, differentiationand apoptosis. The most frequent of these alterations include up-regulation of normal genes through chromosomal translocations(e.g. in the mature B-cell lymphoma) or formation of new fusion-genes (e.g. in the Philadelphiachromosome positive leukaemia) [1].

Solid Tumours in Children

Author(s): M.C.G. Stevens

Solid tumours (excluding brain tumours and lymphoma) account for approximately 45% of all malignant disease in children [1]. There are, in addition, a number of conditions with “borderline”characteristics of malignancy that geneerallycome under the remit of the paediaatriconcologist, for example Langerhans cell histiocytosisand the fibromatoses. Some of these will also be briefly discussed in this paper.

Tumours of the Central Nervous System in Infants and Children

Author(s): G. Perilongo

Brain and spinal central nervous system (CNS) tumours are the most frequent solid tumours occurring in children under 15 years of age, and the second most prevalent group of malignanciesin this age group after leukaemia and lymphoma [1-3]. Indeed, they account for 80% of all tumours. With quite uniform distribution in western countries, CNS neoplasms have a total incidence in the range of 25-40 cases per million. Between the 1970s and the late 1980s, the incidence of childhood CNS tumours increasedby almost 20% as reported by the North American Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) programme, the most complete source of population-based epidemiological data on cancer incidence [2].

Nutritional Aspects of Childhood Oncology

Author(s): A. Papadopoulou

Advances in the treatment of childhood mali-gnancies have achieved a high level of survi-val, which currently exceeds 70% [1]. However, the application of modern treatment protocols and/or the primary disease itself, have vaariousnegative effects on a child’s nutritional status. Furthermore, there is strong evidence that poor nutritional status is associated with higher complication rates that adversely impact di-sease outcomes. The need for providing nutritionalsupport to this group of patients is thereforemost likely universal. The spectrum of nutritional consequences of cancer to children and the methods for nutritional intervention are reviewed below.