Nutrition Publication

What Children Eat

Editor(s): H. Szajewska. 71 / 2

There is a large dataset elucidating that Nutrition in the First 1000 Days has consequences extending into adulthood. The pathogenesis of a number of diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases, obesity, diabetes mellitus, allergy and other immune diseases, some forms of cancer, mental health problems, osteoporosis, chronic respiratory disease, and musculoskeletal conditions, has been linked to maternal and early infant diet and nutrition. In this issue of the Annales Prof. Bhatia updates on the knowledge on how to optimize nutrition of the low birth weight infant with a specific emphasis on human milk and the need for fortification.  Prof. Haschke presents new data showing the eating patterns of infants within the first 2 years of life and nutritional avenues to reduce the risk of allergy in infancy as well as childhood obesity. Finally, the data from the ‘Feeding Infants and Toddlers Study’ (FITS) summarized by Dr. Saavedra states that at the age of 2 years, the dietary patterns established during this period are set for life. The first 2 years therefore provide parents and caregivers with a critical window of opportunity in which to lay the foundation for healthy eating habits, improving the health of the next generation, and curbing the epidemic of obesity.

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