Nutrition Publication

Key Issues on Prematurity

Editor(s): International Committee of Paediatricians. 63 / 2

Outcome After Preterm Birth Nutrition of Premature Babies Post-Discharge How Should we Care for Infants Born at the Limit of Viability? This publication is not available online yet. You can buy it on the Karger website

Related Articles

Editorial

Author(s): Editorial Committee

Outcome After Preterm Birth Nutrition of Premature Babies Post-Discharge How Should we Care for Infants Born at the Limit of Viability? This publication is not available online yet. You can buy it on the Karger website

Outcome after Preterm Birth

Author(s): A. Farooqi, F. Serenius

Preterm infants comprise a vulnerable groupof infants and depending on their degree ofimmaturity and conditions at birth require variousamounts of attention or life support in theneonatal period. In industrialised countries,preterm birth is responsible for 70% of neonatalmortality, and 75% of neonatal morbidity, andcontributes to long-term neurodevelopmentalproblems, pulmonary dysfunction and visualimpairments[1].

Nutrition of Premature Babies Post-Discharge

Author(s): R.J. Schanler

The nutrient needs and appropriate growthrates of the hospitalised premature infant havebeen reviewed elsewhere [1]. In the post-dischargeperiod, however, such data are not available.Although the rate of foetal growth servesas the standard for the infant less than 36 weeksgestation and breastfeedingmeets the needs ofthe healthy term infant, neither goal has beenshown to apply to the premature infant posthospitaldischarge [2].

How Should We Care for Infants Born at the Limit of Viability?

Author(s): T.M. Berger

the past two decades led to unprecedented lowmortality rates for extremely-low-birth-weight(ELBW) infants [1, 2]. Improved prenatal care,regionalisation of perinatal care [3], use of corticosteroidsantenatally [4], surfactant replacementtherapy [5] and new respiratory supportstrategies have all contributed to this success.