News article

Promoting good hydration, promotes good health

Posted:  Monday, October 15, 2012

Just one glass of water a day can make a big difference to cognitive performance and those who regularly drink water consume less calories and have a healthier lifestyle than those who drink sweetened caloric beverages. These are two of the conclusions from some of the studies into hydration available to download on the Nestlé Nutrition Institute website.

The studies suggest that adequate hydration can have a significant impact on a person’s quality of life and their ability to perform at their mental and physical best.

For example, in a US study into the link between cognitive performance and hydration in older adults (>50 years), where there was as little as one or two glasses of water difference between the two groups tested, the mental performance of less hydrated participants fell way short of those who had drunk sufficient amounts of water the day before. 

Another US survey that sought to understand the role of water in diets, found that high water consumers have better eating and drinking patterns and consume on average 194 calories less a day than non-water consumers. It revealed that younger, less educated adults where the most likely to opt for sweetened caloric beverages (SCBs) over drinking water, highlighting a need for better information about the importance of good hydration targeted at this group.

The US Beverage Guidance Panel backed this conclusion with its own studies into the health benefits of a range of drinks regularly consumed across America. In its ranking, the top three drinks were drinking water, followed by unsweetened tea and coffee, and low-fat and skimmed milk and soy beverages. The Panel also saw a link between the consumption of sweetened caloric drinks and excess energy intake and recommended that calorie-free beverages, ideally drinking water, should provide 60%, if not 100%, of an individuals daily fluids needs.

If you would like to read more about these studies and their conclusions, please use the following links:

Popkin et al., Water and food consumption patterns of U.S. adults from 1999 to 2001
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Stookey et al., Replacing sweetened caloric beverages with drinking water is associated with lower energy intake
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Suhr et al. The relation of hydration status to cognitive performance in healthy older adults.
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Popkin et al., A New Proposed Guidance System for Beverage Consumption in the United States
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