Nutrition Publication

The Nest 43: Prevention of Lactational Mastitis for a Successful Breastfeeding

Editor(s): Ryan, Purandare, McGuire, Hurtado, Fores-Quijano. / 43

Lactational Mastitis is one of the most common problems encountered in the breastfeeding mother and is often a cause of breastfeeding cessation. Growing evidence in the last decade suggests there is a role for the human milk microbiota, and its changes, in the appearance of a mastitis. This publication brings into attention not only practical aspects related  to mastitis prevention, including the role of probiotics. 

Related Articles

The Human Milk Microbiome – An Important New Twist in Infant Nutrition

Author(s): M. McGuire

Prof. Michelle McGuire highlights in this article the variation in human milk microbiome signatures according to different factors such as maternal diet and health and use of antibiotics. It is also discussed that more research is required to understand better the origin of breast milk’s microbiome and its potential impact on maternal and infant health.

Mastitis Prevention Strategies

Author(s): M. Flores-Quijano

This article discusses mastitis prevention strategies including general recommendations to protect the women’s immune system and milk microbiota. It also brings up the crucial role of breastfeeding councelling on adequate lactation practices and the correct breastfeeding techniques on reducing the risk of mastitis.

Etiology of Mastitis: The Role of Infection and Microbiota

Author(s): J. Hurtado

Growing evidence in the last decade suggests there is a role for the human milk microbiota, and its changes, in the appearance of a mastitis. In this article Dr. Jose Hurtado highlights the role of probiotics, especially L. fermentum CECT5716, to help balancing the microbiota and reduce the risk of mastitis.

Epidemiology of Mastitis

Author(s): G. Ryan and C. Purandare

Mastitis is one of the most problems encountered by the breastfeeding mother. Prevalence varies from one population to another, but can reach rates as high as 30%. Although complications can occur, when properly treated and with adequate support and education, breastfeeding can be continued.