Nutrition Publication

Nutrition of the Low-Birth-Weight Infant

Editor(s): F. Haschke. 69 / 1

Preterm birth has to be acknowledged as a nutritional emergency. When nutrition is adequate severe short and long-term consequences can be prevented. However, in practice adequate nutrient provision is rarely achieved. Proper and frequent monitoring as well as further research is required to increase our understanding of the nutrtitional requirements in this vulnerable population. The nutritional challenges do not end when the preterm infant leaves the hospital. This issue of the Annales indicates ways to achieve adequate nutrition of the LBW and VLBW infant during hospital stay and after discharge. Finally the clinical evidence of some common types of supplements are thoroughly reviewed.

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