Nutrition Publication

Growth of Children - A Global Perspective

Editor(s): International Committee of Paediatricians. 65 / 3

Obituary Editorial Physiology of Growth The New WHO Growth Standards. Comparison with Other Growth Charts Short and Tall Stature Growth and Chronic Disease This publication is not available online yet. You can buy it on the Karger website

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Editorial

Author(s): Editorial Committee

Obituary Editorial Physiology of Growth The New WHO Growth Standards. Comparison with Other Growth Charts Short and Tall Stature Growth and Chronic Disease This publication is not available online yet. You can buy it on the Karger website

Obituary

Author(s): S.J. Fomon , E.E. Ziegler, F. Haschke

A career-long preoccupation with growth is what sets Samuel J. Fomon apart from most other nutrition scientists. Not to belittle his many other contributions, but the elucidation of childhood body composition and its changes and the introduction of growth as an indicator of nutritional adequacy stand out as his most distinct and arguably most important contributions. Had he done nothing else, his place in the pantheon of nutrition science would be secure. He did, of course, do much else.

Physiology of Growth

Author(s): A.L. Rosenbloom

Human growth is a dynamic and complex process that begins with fertilization of the ovum and is completed with the fusion of epiphyses and metastases of the long bones marking the completion of adolescence. Growth occurs in phases with distinctive characteristics in terms of dominant influences from among genetic, environmental/nutritional, and hormonal factors and patterns. Prenatal growth is the most dramatic phase, achieving a velocity that is never again matched. It is predominantly under the influence of maternal size and nutritional status with little influence of parental genetic endowment. Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and insulin are critical, but thyroid hormone and growth hormone (GH) are not. Infancy is a period of rapidly changing growth rate, from 20 cm/year during the first few months to 10–12 cm/year by 1 year of age.

The New WHO Growth Standards. Comparison with Other Growth Charts

Author(s): E.E. Ziegler, S.E. Nelson

The new World Health Organization (WHO) growth standards were created with the intention of producing globally applicable growth standards that describe the growth of children as it occurs under optimal nutritional conditions and in the absence of external constraints. In other words, it represents childhood growth as it should be. Children in six countries living in favorable circumstances provided data for the new charts.

Short and Tall Stature

Author(s): J.H. Bramswig

Short or tall stature is primarily a normal variation of height. It is part of the continuum of the normal Gaussian distribution curve which defines the lower and upper limit of normal as the 3rd and 97th percentile. Within this context it is very important to differentiate normal variations in height and growth from pathological conditions. Normal variations in height are familial and idiopathic short or tall stature.

Growth and Chronic Disease

Author(s): L. Patel

Growth impairment occurs with many chronic conditions. Cystic fibrosis, Crohn’s disease and juvenile idiopathic arthritis are relatively common chronic diseases in childhood associated with substantial growth impairment. While growth failure may be the initial presenting feature of pathology, the pattern of growth is also a useful measure of disease severity and response to treatment.